Music Of Spain

Flamenco music is a form of the authentic southern Spanish art form. It can be explained well if divided into three forms — firstly Cane the song, Baile the dance, and Guitarra the guitar. Spanish music has been influenced by several cultures and that is because many diverse cultured countries dominated Spain. Gypsies are synonymous with Spain and can definitely be called the Fathers of Spanish music. The legendary Tartessos, the songs and dances of Andalusia, and the Muslims were all factors which greatly influenced the Spanish music.

It is very difficult to assess in what way and context the music of Spain was influenced but it surely gave rise to several different styles and manners which were quite different from the rest of Europe.

The Romans, Greeks, and the Moors greatly affected the composition of music in the early period. The music of the Christian Church in Spain is known as a Mozarabic chant. Arabic music influenced Spanish instrumental music during the early Renaissance. During the early 16th century, the polyphonic style of music originated in Spain. It was kind of related to the style of Franco-Flemish composer. Artists like Antonio Soler got inspired by Italian models, this was during the arrival of Classicism. The famous Madrid Court appointed the famous and renowned Italian composers such as Domenico Scarlatti and Luigi Boccherini.

Many music festivals were organized and these actually originated to boost local tourism. The local tourists have a great interest in music and many measures were taken to make music more famous and popular. Rock and roll and pop are famous kinds of music and many famous pop stars in Spain are females. Ye Ye is another form of music that is a fusion of American rock and British beat music. Some of Spain’s famous singers are Miguel Bose, Rosa Lopez, Enrique Iglesias and many more. Some of the famous pop groups are Los Bravos, Ketama, Greta, Pereza, and Falling Kids.

Regional folk music with folk-based singers and songwriters are also a part of Spain’s music. As in the Basque Country, Cantabrian folk music features intricate arch and stick dances but tabor pipes did not play such a predominant role. Aside from a rich tradition for rebec, a popular instrumental setting encompasses drum and alto clarinet players. All over Castile, there is also a strong tradition of dance music for Juliana and rondalla groups. Popular rhythms include 5/8 charreada and circle dances, Joya, and habeas Verdes.

Source by Jared Lee

Aniekan Udofia – You Think You Know, But You Don’t

Stand in any metropolitan corridor and ask the art scene denizens there what they know about Aniekan Udofia. Some might list the 33-year-old among the most talented visual artists of his generation, with national attention on his work in hip hop magazines such as XXL, Vibe and The Source.

And on a local level, others might even christen the Nigerian artist as “the face of the D.C. art movement that mixes political themes with a hip-hop aesthetic.” But no matter what you hear, Aniekan will tell you himself they only scratch the surface of who he really is.

For starters, meet his parents, Dr. George and Edna Udofia. They came to the U.S. from Nigeria for school while the Civil War raged back in their home country (the Nigeria-Biafra War lasted from July 6, 1967, to Jan. 15, 1970). Nigerians first came to the United States to attend American universities, intending to return home, writes Kalu Obama in his book “The Nigerian Americans.” But for the first time in Nigeria history, the civil war “became the cause of immigration, and more students from the war-ravaged Eastern Nigeria easily made good cases for their immigration to the United States.” So George and Edna studied law and nursing, respectively, at universities in Washington, D.C. They settled down and started a family. Aniekan, the second of five children and the first son in the family, was born on Nov. 26, 1975.

Obama, professor of English and Africana Studies at Southern Connecticut State University, continues: “The gloomy sociopolitical and economic conditions in Nigeria resulting from their civil war were so unbearable for Easterners that everybody wanted to flee the country.” By 1980, the number of Nigerian immigrants in the U.S. rose to 25,528. Also, the emergence of military dictatorships, the abuse of power and denial of human rights led to a mass exodus of trained personnel in university institutions from Nigeria. By 1990, the number of Nigerians in the U.S. more than doubled to 55,350. But instead of following the trend, George and Edna decided to whisk their children away from their birthplace in Northwest D.C. to Nigeria’s Akwa Ibom state in 1982.

Aniekan, who was 7 at the time of the trip, is of the Ibibio people, one of more than 250 ethnic groups in Nigeria – the three most popular being Yoruba, Ibo (or Igbo) and Hausa-Fulani. Located in southeastern Nigeria, mainly in the Cross River state, the Ibibio are rainforest cultivators of yams, taro, and cassava. They export mostly palm oil and palm kernels; they’re also noted for their skillful wood carving.

Back in Nigeria, George taught French in high school, and Edna was a health educator. They had high hopes for their first son, Aniekan. “As a patriarchal society, sons are trained to be strong and assertive and to develop leadership qualities that will enable them to inherit the leadership roles of their fathers at home, should such fathers die or become old, ill, or infirm,” Obama writes. Also, “They are supposed to be providers of their family members’ needs and to give them security as well as emotional and economic protection at all times.” According to Aniekan, his parents thought he was destined to go to college and major in something more practical than art, or pick up a trade and work with his hands. But instead, he embraced a movement from overseas.

Having grown up on highlife, a musical genre that originated in Ghana in the 1900s before eventually spreading to Sierra Leone, Nigeria, and other West African countries by 1920, Aniekan was,s familiar with legends such as Ibo highlife innovator Sonny Okosun and Victor Olaiya, a Yoruba singer and trumpeter. But hip hop captured the then-17-year-old in ways highlife couldn’t. “It was the expression of it…Even with Slick Rick, how he tells the story,” Aniekan recalls. “He’s rapping, but it’s like he’s singing…the art of twisting words.” (He likened listening to Kool G Rap, a precise wordsmith, to “playing Tetris at high-speed.”) Aniekan’s first encounter with the art form was through a friend, who passed him a Kid ‘N Play cassette tape in 1992. Other encounters came through friends who got VHS tapes of Yo! MTV Raps from their relatives in the U.S. “We didn’t have a VCR,” Aniekan says. “It was like one person in the hood had one, so we would all go 15 deep to that person’s crib, hang out, watch those videos and get all hype, trying to talk like the guys in the videos.”

At the same time, record shops started popping up all over Uyo, a city that became the capital of Akwa Ibom State on Sept. 23, 1987. “You had DJs who had spots like that and they put these big speakers outside,” Aniekan says. “That’s where we used to hang out.” Other hang-outs were barbershops, which usually consisted of a closet-sized space with a chair, a sign, a comb, and some clippers. Some barbers were fortunate enough to turn their humble beginnings into a franchise. One such barber was “Big Stuff,” who had three shops in commercial areas throughout Uyo.

At the time, it was customary for barbers to commission local artists to create price lists and posters for their shops. Big Stuff commissioned an artist that completely changed Aniekan’s life. Through this artist, the budding hip hop head would understand the power of expression through illustrations. “It was a guy named Arabian…He would do shit and you would just look at the piece [amazed],” Aniekan says. “He had a lot of creativity.” He recalls Arabian incorporating hip hop styles, with guys dressed in hoodies and posing in the stylish rides of the time. “The style was so crazy the way he did it. Every last one he did was different.” There was a price list, where a guy had a finger over his mouth while another hand pointed to a price list painted in what looked like a hole in the wall. Another one was an illustration of three guys posted up outside a well – one guy on a cell phone, the other on look-out while the third pulled a price list out of the well. “His imagination was just something crazy,” Aniekan says. “Crazy!”

However, his hopes of finding a mentor in Arabian were dashed when they met in 1995. Until that point, Aniekan would walk around with a sketchbook, looking for work that Arabian illustrated. “I would go try to copy it and practice at home,” Aniekan says. Noticing the young artist’s interest, Big Stuff gave Aniekan and Arabian piece from his shop to take home and study. “So I went and studied it and tried to figure out how he used the color, what kind of color he was using.” (“Was it watercolor or crayons?” he wondered). This was between 1994 and 1997, what he called his “study era.”

It’s the era he practiced the “photo-realistic” style of drawing. He experimented until he came up with his own style of drawing faces with color pencils and ink, and then pasting them over a different background. He was anxious when Big Stuff took him to Arabian’s home in 1995. “When I finally met him, I was all groupie-field,” Aniekan says. “I get to meet him and I’m all shy.” The magic soon wore off, when Aniekan said Arabian had promised to draw him something. “He never really got around to it. It just turned into me constantly going over there and him blowing me off.”

He turned that discouragement into determination and set out on a one-man mission to figure out how Arabian did it. In the process, Aniekan slowly made a name for himself by drawing various haircut styles and selling it to barbers. He started coming up with his own concepts for barbershop posters. In an earlier creation, he took a piece of board and drew a hand cutting hair with an arrow pointing in the direction of the barber’s chair. “People would see it from down the hill and they would know a barber was right there,” Aniekan recalls. In exchange, the barber gave him $50 for the poster. Aniekan aimed to get his name, like Arabian’s, all over Uyo. He soon became a sought-after artist among local barbers asking him, “Yo, could you draw me some haircuts or whatever.”

His popularity, however, wasn’t enough to impress his parents, nor quell their desires for him to fulfill his duties as the first son. “I went to technical schools [and] vocational schools; they were trying to change my mind,” Aniekan says. But everywhere he went, he saw people as passionate about their fields as he was about art. During the 17-year battle with his parents, he wrote letters to an aunt that lives in D.C. After several correspondences, she granted his request by sending him a plane ticket to come and try his hand in the U.S. art industry. He came to D.C. in 1999, at the age of 24. Since he’s been here, he’s captured the national attention of clothing designers and magazines – no longer the new fish splashing around in the national art scene. He’s created designs for And 1, an urban athletic wear company, and was the premier artist for the D.C.-based Native Tongue Urban Apparel line.

Also, his works have been featured in various urban publications such as Rime, Elemental, DC Pulse, and Frank 151. His illustrations also graced the album covers of hip hop artists such as Critically Acclaimed and Flex Mathew, as well as the covers of books and hip hop journals.

In 2004, Aniekan joined Artwork Mbilashaka (AM) Radio, a loose band of four to 10 visual artists and a DJ. They’re contracted by corporate clients to create a 7 x 5 artistic interpretation of their logo in front of a live audience. As a part of this group, Aniekan worked on projects for clients including Red Bull, Heineken, Honda, Current TV, Timberland, and Adidas.

He uses hip-hop themes as a social commentary on issues he feels are left lingering such as religion, gender wars (“Is homosexuality right or wrong? Who’s to choose?”), and racism. They also focus on American consumerism. In one of his controversial pieces, former President George W. Bush is in several poses, holding machine guns. On his shirt: “Got Oil?”

Some of his work was controversial enough to draw criticism from viewers, and some galleries have even asked him to take down his paintings. Even still, his style of “telling the truth” is one most people can appreciate. In a June editorial review, Rhome Anderson (aka DJ Stylus) likened Aniekan to a local treasure. “From murals around town to his live improvised painting at musical events, Udofia is as much a fixture in the urban art scene as the DJs, vocalists, producers, and musicians,” Anderson writes on washingtonpost.com. “As part of the Words, Beats, and Life’s ‘Remixing the Art of Social Change’ teach-in, Udofia was commissioned to craft a completely new series of pieces.”

On a Tuesday afternoon, Aniekan is hard at work on a new commission. His one-room apartment on 17th Street NW doubles as his warehouse and art studio. Cross the threshold and you walk towards a stash of comic books neatly stacked alongside various hip hop and art magazines. Look around, and you’ll see a work-in-progress set on an easel in the middle of his kitchen – artwork lining the wall along the entrance, above his cabinets, and into his bedroom. His most recent show, The Sickness 3, opened at Dissident Display on H Street NE in June. Aniekan wanted the show to be a departure from his popular hip hop-themed works. His peers’ reactions varied. “It was good and bad. Some people were like, ‘I’m not feeling this new, monochromatic, one-color-themed, crazy stuff,'” he recalls. “But then there were people who were like, ‘Wow! That’s actually dope.’ It’s a stretch and I feel I need to tend more towards that side.”

Looking around his kitchen, a reporter noticed a photo of Fela Kuti, the Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician, and composer. In the artwork, three different Fellas take on different hues – a blue Fela looks up at a black and white Fela who’s playing the saxophone. In the background, a silver Fela raises his arms in a victory pose through an outline of Africa. When asked if Nigeria or elements of his Ibibio tribe ever work their way into his paintings, Aniekan looks up from a sketch to carefully consider his answer. “If I choose to do a specific back home kind of theme”-such as the EVOLUTION OF CULTURE show, which opened April 3 at Wisconsin Overlook on Wisconsin Avenue NW- “that’s when I usually bring out those traits of where I’m from,” Aniekan says. “It’s more of a choice.”

It’s a choice he feels that musicians and other artists should have the right to exercise without being labeled cultural sell-outs, or worst. Take Fela, the Afrobeat music pioneer, and human rights activist. He didn’t start as the political maverick he’s known as today. “He was into music…he started with highlife, which he grew up into,” Aniekan says. When Fela noticed some social and economic issues went unaddressed, his music became his bullhorn – “where he started just banging on the presidents” and corrupt politicians. “That took him to another level,” Aniekan says. “He wasn’t writing just about Nigeria; what he wrote was pretty much Africa, itself, and the world.”

That connection with the world is what Aniekan is looking for with his art. He knows If he puts his art in a box labeled “African art,” it would narrow the scope of his work. The same thing if he only did “hip hop” paintings. So what does he do? He pushes himself with each painting. Aniekan says, “As a visual artist, it’s for people to see your progression.”

Source by Alan W. King

How To Enjoy Opera – Tips For Newbies – What Is An Opera Orchestra

An opera orchestra is essentially a symphony orchestra with some modifications. There are three major sections: the strings, the winds, and the percussion; plus some add-ons.

The string section includes the violins, altos, cellos, and double-basses. The winds section consists of the brass (the trumpets, trombones, tuba, the French horn), the woodwinds (clarinets, oboes, and the English horn), and the flutes. The percussion section includes the drums, bells, triangle, and cymbals).

It is customary for an opera orchestra to feature at least one harp.

It is really up to the composer to include any additional instruments (a piano or a saxophone, for instance).

During the Baroque period, orchestras were small. Kristof Gluck, Wolfgang Mozart, and Ludwig van Beethoven, among others, contributed to the expansion of the standard symphony orchestra. Large opera orchestras came into existence with the advent of the Grand Opera period.

Richard Wagner almost doubled the size of the orchestra for his operas. In Bayreuth, the opera theatre whose construction was conducted under Wagner’s direct supervision features an orchestra pit hidden completely under the stage (so as not to distract the audience). This, among other things, contributed to the size of Wagner’s orchestra.

The conductor’s job is to keep all that wealth of music together (see my article on conductors).

Each opera company has its own orchestra. While different singers (and conductors) can sign on for different performances, the members of an opera orchestra usually stay together for the entire season, performing all of the company’s repertoire, night after night.

Even though modern technology has created many new ways of delivering music to the listener, and many new instruments have been invented over the past century, nothing matches an orchestra when it comes to depth, expressiveness, and passion. Some of today’s movies, for instance, in which music is called upon to enhance the psychological effect (including action flicks, comedies, and psychological drama) hire composers to write orchestral scores to fill the soundtrack.

Source by Ricardo Torres

Aniekan Udofia – You Think You Know, But You Don’t

 

Stand in any metropolitan corridor and ask the art scene denizens there what they know about Aniekan Udofia. Some might list the 33-year-old among the most talented visual artists of his generation, with national attention on his work in hip hop magazines such as XXL, Vibe and The Source.

And on a local level, others might even christen the Nigerian artist as “the face of the D.C. art movement that mixes political themes with a hip-hop aesthetic.” But no matter what you hear, Aniekan will tell you himself they only scratch the surface of who he really is.

For starters, meet his parents, Dr. George and Edna Udofia. They came to the U.S. from Nigeria for school while the Civil War raged back in their home country (the Nigeria-Biafra War lasted from July 6, 1967, to Jan. 15, 1970). Nigerians first came to the United States to attend American universities, intending to return home, writes Kalu Obama in his book “The Nigerian Americans.” But for the first time in Nigeria history, the civil war “became the cause of immigration, and more students from the war-ravaged Eastern Nigeria easily made good cases for their immigration to the United States.” So George and Edna studied law and nursing, respectively, at universities in Washington, D.C. They settled down and started a family. Aniekan, the second of five children and the first son in the family, was born on Nov. 26, 1975.

Obama, professor of English and Africana Studies at Southern Connecticut State University, continues: “The gloomy sociopolitical and economic conditions in Nigeria resulting from their civil war were so unbearable for Easterners that everybody wanted to flee the country.” By 1980, the number of Nigerian immigrants in the U.S. rose to 25,528. Also, the emergence of military dictatorships, the abuse of power, and denial of human rights led to a mass exodus of trained personnel in university institutions from Nigeria. By 1990, the number of Nigerians in the U.S. more than doubled to 55,350. But instead of following the trend, George and Edna decided to whisk their children away from their birthplace in Northwest D.C. to Nigeria’s Akwa Ibom state in 1982.

Aniekan, who was 7 at the time of the trip, is of the Ibibio people, one of more than 250 ethnic groups in Nigeria – the three most popular being Yoruba, Ibo (or Igbo) and Hausa-Fulani. Located in southeastern Nigeria, mainly in the Cross River state, the Ibibio are rainforest cultivators of yams, taro, and cassava. They export mostly palm oil and palm kernels; they’re also noted for their skillful wood carving.

Back in Nigeria, George taught French in high school, and Edna was a health educator. They had high hopes for their first son, Aniekan. “As a patriarchal society, sons are trained to be strong and assertive and to develop leadership qualities that will enable them to inherit the leadership roles of their fathers at home, should such fathers die or become old, ill, or infirm,” Obama writes. Also, “They are supposed to be providers of their family members’ needs and to give them security as well as emotional and economic protection at all times.” According to Aniekan, his parents thought he was destined to go to college and major in something more practical than art, or pick up a trade and work with his hands. But instead, he embraced a movement from overseas.

Having grown up on highlife, a musical genre that originated in Ghana in the 1900s before eventually spreading to Sierra Leone, Nigeria and other West African countries by 1920, Aniekan was familiar with legends such as Ibo highlife innovator Sonny Okosun and Victor Olaiya, a Yoruba singer and trumpeter. But hip hop captured the then-17-year-old in ways highlife couldn’t. “It was the expression of it…Even with Slick Rick, how he tells the story,” Aniekan recalls. “He’s rapping, but it’s like he’s singing…the art of twisting words.” (He likened listening to Kool G Rap, a precise wordsmith, to “playing Tetris at high-speed.”) Aniekan’s first encounter with the art form was through a friend, who passed him a Kid ‘N Play cassette tape in 1992. Other encounters came through friends who got VHS tapes of Yo! MTV Raps from their relatives in the U.S. “We didn’t have a VCR,” Aniekan says. “It was like one person in the hood had one, so we would all go 15 deep to that person’s crib, hang out, watch those videos and get all hype, trying to talk like the guys in the videos.”

At the same time, record shops started popping up all over Uyo, a city that became the capital of Akwa Ibom State on Sept. 23, 1987. “You had DJs who had spots like that and they put these big speakers outside,” Aniekan says. “That’s where we used to hang out.” Other hang-outs were barbershops, which usually consisted of a closet-sized space with a chair, a sign, a comb, and some clippers. Some barbers were fortunate enough to turn their humble beginnings into a franchise. One such barber was “Big Stuff,” who had three shops in commercial areas throughout Uyo.

At the time, it was customary for barbers to commission local artists to create price lists and posters for their shops. Big Stuff commissioned an artist that completely changed Aniekan’s life. Through this artist, the budding hip hop head would understand the power of expression through illustrations. “It was a guy named Arabian…He would do shit and you would just look at the piece [amazed],” Aniekan says. “He had a lot of creativity.” He recalls Arabian incorporating hip hop styles, with guys dressed in hoodies and posing in the stylish rides of the time. “The style was so crazy the way he did it. Every last one he did was different.” There was a price list, where a guy had a finger over his mouth while another hand pointed to a price list painted in what looked like a hole in the wall. Another one was an illustration of three guys posted up outside a well – one guy on a cell phone, the other on look-out while the third pulled a price list out of the well. “His imagination was just something crazy,” Aniekan says. “Crazy!”

However, his hopes of finding a mentor in Arabian were dashed when they met in 1995. Until that point, Aniekan would walk around with a sketchbook, looking for work that Arabian illustrated. “I would go try to copy it and practice at home,” Aniekan says. Noticing the young artist’s interest, Big Stuff gave Aniekan and Arabian piece from his shop to take home and study. “So I went and studied it and tried to figure out how he used the color, what kind of color he was using.” (“Was it watercolor or crayons?” he wondered). This was between 1994 and 1997, what he called his “study era.”

It’s the era he practiced the “photo-realistic” style of drawing. He experimented until he came up with his own style of drawing faces with color pencils and ink, and then pasting them over a different background. He was anxious when Big Stuff took him to Arabian’s home in 1995. “When I finally met him, I was all groupie-field,” Aniekan says. “I get to meet him and I’m all shy.” The magic soon wore off, when Aniekan said Arabian had promised to draw him something. “He never really got around to it. It just turned into me constantly going over there and him blowing me off.”

He turned that discouragement into determination and set out on a one-man mission to figure out how Arabian did it. In the process, Aniekan slowly made a name for himself by drawing various haircut styles and selling it to barbers. He started coming up with his own concepts for barbershop posters. In an earlier creation, he took a piece of board and drew a hand cutting hair with an arrow pointing in the direction of the barber’s chair. “People would see it from down the hill and they would know a barber was right there,” Aniekan recalls. In exchange, the barber gave him $50 for the poster. Aniekan aimed to get his name, like Arabian’s, all over Uyo. He soon became a sought-after artist among local barbers asking him, “Yo, could you draw me some haircuts or whatever.”

His popularity, however, wasn’t enough to impress his parents, nor quell their desires for him to fulfill his duties as the first son. “I went to technical schools [and] vocational schools; they were trying to change my mind,” Aniekan says. But everywhere he went, he saw people as passionate about their fields as he was about art. During the 17-year battle with his parents, he wrote letters to an aunt that lives in D.C. After several correspondences, she granted his request by sending him a plane ticket to come and try his hand in the U.S. art industry. He came to D.C. in 1999, at the age of 24. Since he’s been here, he’s captured the national attention of clothing designers and magazines – no longer the new fish splashing around in the national art scene. He’s created designs for And 1, an urban athletic wear company, and was the premier artist for the D.C.-based Native Tongue Urban Apparel line.

Also, his works have been featured in various urban publications such as Rime, Elemental, DC Pulse, and Frank 151. His illustrations also graced the album covers of hip hop artists such as Critically Acclaimed and Flex Mathew, as well as the covers of books and hip hop journals.

In 2004, Aniekan joined Artwork Mbilashaka (AM) Radio, a loose band of four to 10 visual artists and a DJ. They’re contracted by corporate clients to create a 7 x 5 artistic interpretation of their logo in front of a live audience. As a part of this group, Aniekan worked on projects for clients including Red Bull, Heineken, Honda, Current TV, Timberland, and Adidas.

He uses hip-hop themes as a social commentary on issues he feels are left lingering such as religion, gender wars (“Is homosexuality right or wrong? Who’s to choose?”), and racism. They also focus on American consumerism. In one of his controversial pieces, former President George W. Bush is in several poses, holding machine guns. On his shirt: “Got Oil?”

Some of his work was controversial enough to draw criticism from viewers, and some galleries have even asked him to take down his paintings. Even still, his style of “telling the truth” is one most people can appreciate. In a June editorial review, Rhome Anderson (aka DJ Stylus) likened Aniekan to a local treasure. “From murals around town to his live improvised painting at musical events, Udofia is as much a fixture in the urban art scene as the DJs, vocalists, producers, and musicians,” Anderson writes on washingtonpost.com. “As part of the Words, Beats, and Life’s ‘Remixing the Art of Social Change’ teach-in, Udofia was commissioned to craft a completely new series of pieces.”

On a Tuesday afternoon, Aniekan is hard at work on a new commission. His one-room apartment on 17th Street NW doubles as his warehouse and art studio. Cross the threshold and you walk towards a stash of comic books neatly stacked alongside various hip hop and art magazines. Look around, and you’ll see a work-in-progress set on an easel in the middle of his kitchen – artwork lining the wall along the entrance, above his cabinets, and into his bedroom. His most recent show, The Sickness 3, opened at Dissident Display on H Street NE in June. Aniekan wanted the show to be a departure from his popular hip hop-themed works. His peers’ reactions varied. “It was good and bad. Some people were like, ‘I’m not feeling this new, monochromatic, one-color-themed, crazy stuff,'” he recalls. “But then there were people who were like, ‘Wow! That’s actually dope.’ It’s a stretch and I feel I need to tend more towards that side.”

Looking around his kitchen, a reporter noticed a photo of Fela Kuti, the Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician, and composer. In the artwork, three different Fellas take on different hues – a blue Fela looks up at a black and white Fela who’s playing the saxophone. In the background, a silver Fela raises his arms in a victory pose through an outline of Africa. When asked if Nigeria or elements of his Ibibio tribe ever work their way into his paintings, Aniekan looks up from a sketch to carefully consider his answer. “If I choose to do a specific back home kind of theme”-such as the EVOLUTION OF CULTURE show, which opened April 3 at Wisconsin Overlook on Wisconsin Avenue NW- “that’s when I usually bring out those traits of where I’m from,” Aniekan says. “It’s more of a choice.”

It’s a choice he feels that musicians and other artists should have the right to exercise without being labeled cultural sell-outs, or worst. Take Fela, the Afrobeat music pioneer, and human rights activist. He didn’t start as the political maverick he’s known as today. “He was into music…he started with highlife, which he grew up into,” Aniekan says. When Fela noticed some social and economic issues went unaddressed, his music became his bullhorn – “where he started just banging on the presidents” and corrupt politicians. “That took him to another level,” Aniekan says. “He wasn’t writing just about Nigeria; what he wrote was pretty much Africa, itself, and the world.”

That connection with the world is what Aniekan is looking for with his art. He knows If he puts his art in a box labeled “African art,” it would narrow the scope of his work. The same thing if he only did “hip hop” paintings. So what does he do? He pushes himself with each painting. Aniekan says, “As a visual artist, it’s for people to see your progression.”

Source by Alan W. King

The Scoop on Musician and Musical Instrument Insurance

Whether it is a baby’s lullaby, a classical piece, or pop music of the generation, music certainly plays a large role in our lives. Entertaining, a song can uplift, make us laugh or cry, get us up and moving, or engaged at the moment like no other.

Being able to create music can be learned, but the true artist has the ability already there since birth – a powerful talent that stirs the emotions of anyone who listens.

Like any entertainer or public performer though, the professional musician has certain undeniable risks. The exposures to the risks are varied due to the differences in each type of music player.

What factors determine the difference in exposure? You might say they can be categorized by the following issues:

1. What type of musical instrument the musician uses

2. What type of audience the musician plays for

3. What type of management the musician uses for performances and business distribution of music

To explain number one: what type of musical instrument is used: it really depends on the kind of instrument. No one will deny there is a difference in a guitar and a grand piano and the exposure to injury or harm is also different. There is a further variance, however and that is about value. Just as the guitar and piano differ in cost, so does it for the trombone, a saxophone, a fiddle, a harp, a violin, a drum set, and so on. Clearly, insurance for the pricier instrument will be more involved.

The second consideration, of course, is what type of crowd the performing musician plays for. A special event in a large outdoor stadium that houses thousands and a hundred-people event in a local social hall obviously has differing exposures.

Naturally, as well, the musician that fends for him or herself to get hired and have his or her music produced for the public will need to get busy with acquiring the right type of coverage as opposed to the music guy that signs up with a talent agent that handles engagements, recordings, and distributions, travel arrangements along with associated commercial insurance coverage.

For those musicians that think their Homeowners Insurance will cover them if their musical instrument is stolen, lost, or damaged, it is time to think again. A standard Homeowner policy solely covers the amateur player. Musical instruments played by professionals need a floater that ensures coverage for transporting them by car, truck, van, and so on, as well as for off-premises exposures.

Music to the Ears in a Different Sense

The musician needs to speak with an experienced independent agency to determine the type of coverage that is the right fit.

Source by M Wyzanski

It Happened One Night


Price: points - Details)



Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert team up for laughs as mismatched lovers in this 1934 screwball comedy classic. Spoiled Ellie Andrews (Colbert) escapes from her millionaire father (Walter Connolly),who wants to stop her from marrying a worthless playboy. En route to New York, Ellie gets involved with an out-of-work newsman, Peter Warne (Gable). When their bus breaks down, the bickering couple set off on a madcap hitchhiking expedition. Complications fly when the runaway heiress and brash reporter fall in love. Directed by Frank Capra, IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT was the first movie to be honored with all five major Oscars(r): Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director, and Best Screenplay. Now fully restored in 4K, experience this timeless comedy like never before.

Mendini by Cecilio E-Flat Alto Saxophone, Gold Lacquered + Tuner, Case, Pocketbook – MAS-L+92D+PB


Price: $229.99
(as of Apr 17,2021 04:27:23 UTC – Details)



Teacher approved, Mendini saxophones are the perfect instruments for the student musicians and a great addition to any level players. The large bore makes it easy for young players to get a great, full bodied sound and the fast action keys allow for easy playability for all players. The tone is deep and rich with even intonation throughout the full range. Each instrument is assembled with over 300 hand crafted parts that are all made exclusively by Cecilio. There are no off the shelf parts. Every saxophone is play tested at Cecilio’s factory and re-tested at their Los Angeles distribution center to ensure that their high quality standards are met. This is why thousands of instructors have approved these saxophones. Package includes: a plush lined nylon covered hard case with backpack strap and zippered pocket, a neck strap, a mouthpiece with reed and cap, a box of 10 reeds (size 2.5″), a polishing cloth, cleaning rod, and a pair of white gloves to keep your instruments spot free when being played. Buy with confidence as it comes with a 1- year warranty against any manufacturer’s defects.

High F# key
Rib construction, stainless steel springs, quality leather pads, metal resonators
Includes: tuner, mouthpiece with ligature, hard case, box of 2.5 reeds, neck strap, cleaning rod, polishing cloth, a pair of gloves and pocketbook
1 Year Warranty Against Manufacturer’s Defects

Eastar Student Tenor Saxophone Sax B Flat TS-Ⅱ Gold Lacquer Beginner Full Kit With Carrying Sax Case Mouthpiece Straps Reeds Stand Cork Grease


Price: $369.99
(as of Apr 17,2021 04:27:23 UTC – Details)



Eastar Would Never Disappoint You.
Tenor saxophone is the one most closely associated with jazz players, as it is a mainstay in that genre. It is tuned to Bb and has the familiar, curved body style. Since it is not as large or heavy as the baritone or bass sax, the tenor is somewhat easier for young beginners to play. However, with its relatively large, curved shape, it still is quite susceptible to damage, so it’s important to make sure the body is built from durable materials.
Eastar TS- II, a special instrument for beginners and intermediate players, has wonderful timbre and excellent intonation. Eastar doesn’t want to impress you with fancy accessories but wanting to give you and your family a really out-of-the-box instrument called Eastar TS- II, an instrument that really meets the requirements of the saxophone experience and learners’ continuous high-intensity exercises. Carefully maintenance of the use of words can meet the needs of the user for many years.
Specifications
1.Color: Gold
2.Key:E Flat With High F# Key
3.Level:Beginner/Intermediate
4.Material: Instruments Dedicated Brass
5.Item Weight:17.5lb/7.9kg
6.Size: 95(L) x 25(W)x 53(H)cm /37.4(L)x 9.84(W)x 20.87(H)inch
7.Carrying Case Material: Nylon Cloth
Package icluded:
1 x Eastar TS- Ⅱ Tenor Saxophone
1 x Carrying Case
1 x Mouthpiece Set
1 x Cork Grease
1 x Real Leather Strap(80lb limit)
2 x Shoulder Strap
1 x White Gloves
1 x Resin Practice Reed
2 x Advanced Bulrush Reeds (Strength 2.5 )
1 x Soft Swab
1 x Soft Cloth
1 x Cleaning Brush

?Top Material — instruments dedicated copper, lead-free welding green craft, feel free to use. Advanced imported leather pads, high air tightness, Imported blue copper needle spring, moderate elasticity, not aging, high feedback when finger pressing.
?Amazing look — Eastar TS -Ⅱ: Transparent Anlique Red Brass , multi-layer painted ,durable and barely to fade color. Faux mother of pearl inlaid keys are simple and generous. The handcrafted carvings of the bell mouth makes TS -Ⅱ perfect even more perfect.
?Practical Design — Full bounding key stick gasket for longer life and better pressing feel. Keystroke link: all being applied oil for debugging before leaving the factory , preventing the link from rusting and getting stuck.Setting the F# key to suit the performance.The U-tube of the bass is adopted: Eastar has accumulated crafts experiences for many years to improve the stability of the bass and achieve a stable feeling of playing and resistance.
?Package Contents — Eastar TS -Ⅱ Tenor saxophone, Carrying Case ,Mouthpiece Set, Real Leather Strap (110lb limit), Cork Grease,Shoulder Strap x 2,White Gloves, Resin Practice Reed x 1, Advanced Bulrush Reeds (Strength 2.5 ), Soft Swab, Soft Cloth, Cleaning Brush. Unique Serial-number for every Eastar AS -Ⅱ.12-Month Product Warranty.

101 Popular Songs: for Alto Sax


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(Instrumental Folio). Instrumentalists will love this jam-packed collection of 101 timeless pop songs! Songs include: Another Brick in the Wall * Billie Jean * Dust in the Wind * Easy * Free Bird * Girls Just Want to Have Fun * Hey Jude * I’m a Believer * Jessie’s Girl * Lean on Me * The Lion Sleeps Tonight * Livin’ on a Prayer * My Girl * Piano Man * Pour Some Sugar on Me * Reeling in the Years * Stand by Me * Sweet Home Alabama * Take Me Home, Country Roads * With or Without You * You Really Got Me * and more.