Just a Reminder (Film yahyahyah)

Just a Reminder (Film yahyahyah)

“Sometimes, I get frustrated because I can’t feel You. I know You’re around me and I know You’re always there. But part of me just wishes I could physically feel your arms as they wrap around me. I wish I could know you better and know if you’re proud of me or disappointed or if I’m doing all of this right…”

And then He says “Imagine the love you have for your boyfriend, your family, your friends and those around you. The way they make you smile. That swelling that occurs in your heart when you think of them and that uncontrollable need you have to just break into a grin from ear to ear. Now imagine my love, a love that saw you in all your weaknesses, your failures, your achievements, your strengths, your sin, and your rebellion. A love that did not write you off as hopeless or useless. No, you are not hopeless or a lost cause because I AM the cause of the lost finding hope.
Do you hear me? I am the cause of the lost finding hope. I gave my Son to you in the most beautiful exchange. I looked into all that you would do wrong and still said: “I want that child”. You are precious in my eyes. You are growing. You are walking and you are stumbling, but a righteous man falls 7 times but each time they get up and continue pursuing righteousness. You are pursuing what is of Me because you are pursuing me. I have given you this love through your friendships, relationships, and family in order to allow you to feel a fraction, only a fraction, of My Great Love for you. “

This is only a little bit of what I feel God putting on my heart lately. He has been opening my eyes up constantly to the beauty around me. Everything He has created. He makes us feel…He made it for a reason. He made you for a reason. And sometimes, it is so easy to get in a dry place and live life day to day without even noticing His incredible ways. God wants you to encounter Him. Sometimes I wonder how? But it’s not about big worded prayers starting with “Abba Father who art and art to come” (I don’t actually speak old school, give me a break haha). It’s about surrendering it all to Him. I talk to God like I talk to the love of my life. He knows my frustrations, my worries, my hurts and He knows all that I am thankful for and all that I am ASTOUNDED by because He is so great.
And for those that ask why I follow Jesus? I follow Him because when I was a sinner when I was a fake when I was a broken mess of lies when I was full of hate, spite, depression, pain, and unbelief…He called me His. He bathed me in light and showed me my filth and He simply said: “My grace is enough.” And through that and His forgiveness, I was set free. I am fuller. I am happier. And I am constantly excited to wake up every morning knowing all the blessings in my life are all because of Him. No matter how poorly my day goes, I will always try, try is the keyword because we are not perfect, to lift my hands in thankfulness. I love Jesus because He first loved me, even when I didn’t know Him.
I encourage you to think of those relationships in your life. And if they aren’t good…do not fret. Imagine how God intended it to be. Imagine the protection, the romance, the security, and comfort that should be found in that bond. Think of those blessings and try to see them as a minor reflection of God’s own love for you.
(PS I JUST SAW TESTIMONIALS FROM FOREVER AGO THAT I DID NOT APPROVE YET. Wow. you guys encourage me, inspire me and give me so much…confidence in who I am and who I have been called to be. Never stop doing what you do because your kind hearts leave me smiling. I love you all!)

Posted by Hannah Martin on 2012-06-24 03:31:09

Tagged:

How I broke my knee

How I broke my knee

I’d been eying this line all year. I’ve skied down almost every rock and cliff face at Solitude that has snow on it and doesn’t involve jumping more than 20 feet to get in or out of, so when I see something new that I think can be skied, it is pretty exciting. I never even realized you could possibly ski this line until it snowed so much this year and filled in.

Every lift ride I’ve taken for the past 2 months I’ve been memorizing the way down… go past the split tree, stop at the next tree, step carefully over the rock band, down the patch of snow below the big rock. Look for the gap to the right. Hold onto the little tree to climb down the next set of rocks. Ski right across the patch of snow above the huge cliff. Jump right side of the cliff.

Actually, I hadn’t planned to ski the line that day – you can ski halfway down the top chute and then bailout to the right into a nice bowl that no one ever skies because the way in is hard to find. But I got halfway there and it looked so great I just kept skiing. Also, I had my helmet camera running so I was psyched to get some sweet footage.

It all went like clockwork — I had to side-slip more than I wanted to — I would have preferred to make turns, but it was pretty rocky and falling would have been death with the 50′ of rocks and cliffs below so I was being pretty cautious.

Anyway, I finally made it to the little patch of snow above the last cliff. The whole thing was pretty straight forward – it went easier than I expected, nothing too terrifying.

The one thing about skiing with a helmet camera is that the more you stop and look around to try and figure out where to go next, the worse the video looks. So if you want to shoot video without having to edit it much or at all, you have to make quick decisions and not move your head around too much. This means you have to know where you are going and try to not make bad decisions because you haven’t taken the time to think things out.

At the last patch of snow, I saw there was a little line of snow off to my right so I could have skied out without even having to jump the final cliff. But, I had scoped the cliff out from below a few weeks earlier and it wasn’t that high, with a nice steep landing.

Another thing is that recently I have been pushing myself a bit farther than usual. Despite the fact that I ski down very steep scary looking things all the time, I am pretty cautious and don’t usually jump off stuff higher than 10-15 feet which on telemark skis seems pretty bold to me as it is. But lately, I’ve been finding myself standing at the top of higher drops thinking…”Well, nothing happened last time I jumped off something big…” and then going for it.

There’s a certain feeling you get once you’ve committed to something like this. The same feeling you have when you jump off a high cliff into the water, that brief second as you run forward, see the edge and know you won’t stop and then are in the air, with safety so close behind you but unable to turn back and you look down to see how far you have to fall. There is something precious and intense and indescribable about that split second where you are hanging in the air, next to safety but totally committed, unable to stop what you’ve set in motion. Then you are falling, landing with a splash of water or an explosion of snow and you look back up and see what you’ve accomplished and thought about that weird fight you undertake between the terror of common sense and the sharp rush of adrenaline.

So there I was, camera running, on a little piece of snow with about 10 feet 45-degree steep snow before a little tree buried in the snow that made a nice launching pad. I couldn’t actually see the landing. Straight down it looked like about 30′ to the ground and a long way out. Not at all safe. Next to that, was a clean drop where I knew it was steeper and the landing was clear since I had checked it out before, but still, it meant I’d need a bit of speed. I took one last look at the nice easy exit out the side, away from the cliff, looked down below me, and threw caution to the wind.

Afterward, I’m always flushed with this amazing feeling of pure experience. A childlike glee that fills me with joy. It is why I keep skiing and why I’d happily spend hours hiking to the top of something and then hanging off of trees and rocks to climb down the face of a cliff no sane person would think was skiable rather than just skiing down a groomed run like a normal person.

Because I’m on telemark skis, I usually try not to land going too fast because then it’s pretty easy to catch an edge, end up with one leg behind you in the air as you hurtle headfirst towards the trees and blow out your knee or worse. So in the interest of not going too fast, I decided to hip check on my landing – If you watch pro skiers when they jump off really huge cliffs, they never land on their feet, they turn in the air and land on their back or side because it is a lot better to let the snow absorb your impact than your knees. This is kind of a weird feeling because instead of making a clean landing, you intentionally turn in the air and essentially crash. If you do it right, you ski-out in a huge explosion of snow and everything is great.

As I’ve started to ski harder and jump off higher things, the moment of fear and anticipation as I commit has gotten more intense. You spend your life gingerly going to the edge of a cliff and peering over and then kind of hoping off. Now I was heading straight down for 15 feet before launching 25′ into the unknown. It definitely one of the bolder things I’ve ever decided to do, but the camera was on and I had decided that I was going to do it so I went.

Skis straight, no turning to slow down.

Down.

Off the launch, in the air, the snow looks soft and deep, I turned slightly onto my right side, anticipating doing a hip check in the deep snow to lose my speed. I braced myself for landing.

I have the moment of impact seared in my brain. I hit the ground, in an explosion of snow, but the snow doesn’t give at all. I’m turned slightly sideways but my momentum is down the hill – straight out from knee like one of those vector sum diagrams you draw in physics class. My leg stays where it was when I landed, parallel to the slope and I hurtle downwards. I’m trying to yank my leg free – this has happened before and I’ve always managed to make it, but I know what happens if you don’t free the stuck ski instantly.

And then there this distinct pop in my knee, my leg comes free and I’m tumbling downwards, stopping, standing up. Vision white with pain. I’m looking down at my legs and they won’t move. My right leg is numb with pain. I can’t even bend over it hurts so much. I hear in my head, over and over, the moment when I hit and that split second as my knee popped, that I knew that this was the one I wasn’t going to ski out of.

Lately, as I’ve skied harder and harder stuff, I keep wondering if (when) I will injure myself. I don’t think you can really do something where there is almost no margin for error, indefinitely, without hurting yourself at some point. It’s simple statistics. But I am pretty cautious, and I’ve managed to ski like mad for 30+ years without any real injuries. After the accident, at least two of my friends commented that I had said, on more than one occasion, something like “It seems like only a matter of time ’till something goes wrong…” within the past few weeks, so maybe I knew what was coming. And now, as I hobble around the house, barely able walk, let alone ski, with months of pain and rehab ahead of me, I think about this over and over. Did I do something wrong? Where was my error in judgment? Was I being dangerous? And what if something worse had happened? From the other stories of ski injury I’ve heard lately, I’m pretty lucky as injuries go.

In “This Game Of Ghosts”, Joe Simpson talks about living in Chamonix and doing completely insane, “out-there” alpine climbs, day in and day out, and how, as people he is close to dying doing similar things, he tells himself stories about how he can avoid their fate because he knows what they did wrong, how he is more careful, he won’t make that mistake. But after a while, and when someone he knows is much more competent than him is killed, he begins to realize that it’s just a game he plays with himself so he can keep climbing, that fate will do what it will and that when you keep doing something that might get you killed, it often does and there is no way to avoid this because it is this edge where what you are risking really is your life, that is what makes you feel alive.

Posted by InfiniteWorld on 2008-02-27 16:12:27

 

I must return it to the sky

I must return it to the sky

Okay, so I’ve been tagged a ton, and never got around to doing facts or anything, so here are ten things you might not have known, but now you do (if you read it).

1. This was actually an outtake, but I liked it. Lol.
2. I’m terrified to travel to space. I’ve played Dead Space. I saw what happened. O_O
3. I really miss swimming. I did it competitively for six years, and at the time, it was a ‘whatever’ thing, but now I kinda miss it. I don’t miss the swim meets, just being in the water, really is all I want.
4. I collect things from abandoned houses. Lol. I have a whole wall dedicated to it, and some other items scattered throughout my apartment.
5. I have two animal skulls that I found, at abandoned houses. Haha. My boyfriend thinks it’s weird, and said he’ll call the police if I ever bring home a human skull. Lol.
6. I really want to do more conceptual photography, but I’m too lazy most of the time. Ha.
7. I can’t wait until I move, mostly so I can foster cats. 🙂
8. I really need to do laundry and dishes. But I probably won’t.
9. Despite getting virtually no hours, I do like working at Gamestop.
10. I need to start working out, so I can get my tattoo. Lol.

P.S. Tags COMPLETELY (sp) random. Lol.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Selling prints, if anyone is interested. Just send me a message. 🙂

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Formspring <—-Ask me stuff. I’m bored. Haha!!

Posted by bellydnce1103 on 2011-02-01 18:57:38

 

Back on the mainland

Back on the mainland

And like all things, it has to come to an end. Looking at Google it suggested a 12-hour drive back to Dover, and it was decided that upon reflection we should have an overnight stop. So on Wednesday, I booked two rooms at the Premier Inn in Kilmarnock from Friday, near to the airport to drop Tony off as he goes on two further weeks of exploring the highlands, and we go home to the cats and garden and then I can travel on Tuesday to sunny Denmark.

We had a lie-in until seven, they were all balls of energy, packing, tidying, and taking the rubbish out, having showers and so by nine, we were ready to go. One last check around the house revealed nothing left behind, so we locked up, put the keys in the safe, and after loading the car we drove out the gates for the last time.

Our first stop this day was Kylerhea, another place Tony’s Grandmother visited in the mid-60s, and he has slides of locations that over the years he has identified. It is also the location of a small ferry leading to the mainland, and is only accessible on either side y long and winding single track roads.

We turn off the main road to the Kyle and take off down a bumpy track, following in the wheel-tracks of a 4×4 ahead, but once we reach the summit of the road, and have breathtaking views into the sound below, we stop to admire it and take shots. As you do.

Soon, we spay a lady, Jos, riding up the hill on her bike, her exercise before she can have breakfast. She stops when she reaches us, talks and speaks bike geek with Tony.

We go down the hill, nearly 1:5 in places, but don’t see the house in the photo, and with the road so narrow, there was nowhere to turn round, so we continue to the stone jetty and wait for the tiny ferry to arrive. It was large enough for six cars, and access from the jetty was by a turntable arrangement.

It seemed slightly Heath-Robinson and dangerous, but for 15 quid, why not? Two common seals splashed around a few meters away as we waited, Jools and I looked at the bottom of the sound through about 2 meters of crystal clear water.

The ferry arrives and offloads the six cars from the other side, and we all gingery drive on the deck, the crew rotating it round ready for sailing. The passenger door was jammed against the railing, so I could not get out, and for 5 minutes, not really worth it. I tell myself.

On the other side, we get off, and Tony takes many shots as it loads up again and sails. The owners have a small shop selling snacks and cans, and payment is via an honesty box. He is amazed, but then this is a simpler place

There is then a ten-mile drive up a narrow lane that steadily climbs the valley, and then down a steeper on the other side, at which point we get stuck behind a logging truck, which has the bonus of scattering other traffic out of the way.

Onto the main road, and the long way round to Fort William, down impressive and sun-drenched valleys, sometimes able to travel at the speed limit and other times at 30mph when stuck behind a motorhome.

Time clicked towards noon and thoughts turn to lunch. I see a sign and turn off thinking there was a hotel down a narrow lane. We go down it with the road leaping around like a rollercoaster, but with no other traffic about I put the Audi through its paces.

We cross the Caledonian Canal and realize we are nearly in Fort William, so at the side of Neptune’s Staircase, a series of eight locks, we find a hotel with views onto the locks, and did food and drink.

We have sandwiches and coffee, which is all very nice, then look for a place to fill up before taking the long road south, stuck behind both a Tesco lorry and a motorhome. We putt along at 30mph for what seems like ages, then thanks to the many horses under the bonnet I get past both on exiting a roundabout and using all available horses.

But we run into the back of a lone of traffic going up Glencoe, and so we put along between 30 and 40 for ages before we can get past the camper van and truck causing the delays.

And then we come to Loch Lomond, where the road snakes around the shores of the loch, and we are in a train of cars behind a coach which has to stop whenever a truck wanted to pass.

But we get through, onto a better road, then at Dumbarton onto a dual carriageway, then over the bridge and onto the motorway, following the Clyde out to sea as I had a date with a station to snap.

Ways Bay is not well known but is where the ferry to Arran leave from, and the once-grand station at the harbor was renovated 20 years ago and is still in good nick. It is incredible really, and using the wide-angle I get the shots I wanted.

We walk on the beach a bit, between the rubbish and dirt nappies, then decide to try to find the hotel, ending up at another ferry port, in a converted industrial building, mixing with the smart set ordering an Italian feast and beers.

We are pooped; six hours of driving and a couple more of photography, and we want to get to the Premier Inn, in Kilmarnock. Which is where we

Posted by Jelltex on 2017-06-09 05:47:10

Tagged: , Jelltex, Jelltecks, Scotland

Back on the mainland

Back on the mainland

And like all things, it has to come to an end. Looking at Google it suggested a 12-hour drive back to Dover, and it was decided that upon reflection we should have an overnight stop. So on Wednesday, I booked two rooms at the Premier Inn in Kilmarnock from Friday, near to the airport to drop Tony off as he goes on two further weeks of exploring the highlands, and we go home to the cats and garden and then I can travel on Tuesday to sunny Denmark.

We had a lie-in until seven, they were all balls of energy, packing, tidying, and taking the rubbish out, having showers and so by nine, we were ready to go. One last check around the house revealed nothing left behind, so we locked up, put the keys in the safe, and after loading the car we drove out the gates for the last time.

Our first stop this day was Kylerhea, another place Tony’s Grandmother visited in the mid-60s, and he has slides of locations that over the years he has identified. It is also the location of a small ferry leading to the mainland, and is only accessible on either side y long and winding single track roads.

We turn off the main road to the Kyle and take off down a bumpy track, following in the wheel-tracks of a 4×4 ahead, but once we reach the summit of the road, and have breathtaking views into the sound below, we stop to admire it and take shots. As you do.

Soon, we spay a lady, Jos, riding up the hill on her bike, her exercise before she can have breakfast. She stops when she reaches us, talks and speaks bike geek with Tony.

We go down the hill, nearly 1:5 in places, but don’t see the house in the photo, and with the road so narrow, there was nowhere to turn round, so we continue to the stone jetty and wait for the tiny ferry to arrive. It was large enough for six cars, and access from the jetty was by a turntable arrangement.

It seemed slightly Heath-Robinson and dangerous, but for 15 quid, why not? Two common seals splashed around a few meters away as we waited, Jools and I looked at the bottom of the sound through about 2 meters of crystal clear water.

The ferry arrives and offloads the six cars from the other side, and we all gingery drive on the deck, the crew rotating it round ready for sailing. The passenger door was jammed against the railing, so I could not get out, and for 5 minutes, not really worth it. I tell myself.

On the other side, we get off, and Tony takes many shots as it loads up again and sails. The owners have a small shop selling snacks and cans, and payment is via an honesty box. He is amazed, but then this is a simpler place

There is then a ten-mile drive up a narrow lane that steadily climbs the valley, and then down a steeper on the other side, at which point we get stuck behind a logging truck, which has the bonus of scattering other traffic out of the way.

Onto the main road, and the long way round to Fort William, down impressive and sun-drenched valleys, sometimes able to travel at the speed limit and other times at 30mph when stuck behind a motorhome.

Time clicked towards noon and thoughts turn to lunch. I see a sign and turn off thinking there was a hotel down a narrow lane. We go down it with the road leaping around like a rollercoaster, but with no other traffic about I put the Audi through its paces.

We cross the Caledonian Canal and realize we are nearly in Fort William, so at the side of Neptune’s Staircase, a series of eight locks, we find a hotel with views onto the locks and did food and drink.

We have sandwiches and coffee, which is all very nice, then look for a place to fill up before taking the long road south, stuck behind both a Tesco lorry and a motorhome. We putt along at 30mph for what seems like ages, then thanks to the many horses under the bonnet I get past both on exiting a roundabout and using all available horses.

But we run into the back of a lone of traffic going up Glencoe, and so we put along between 30 and 40 for ages before we can get past the camper van and truck causing the delays.

And then we come to Loch Lomond, where the road snakes around the shores of the loch, and we are in a train of cars behind a coach which has to stop whenever a truck wanted to pass.

But we get through, onto a better road, then at Dumbarton onto a dual carriageway, then over the bridge and onto the motorway, following the Clyde out to sea as I had a date with a station to snap.

Ways Bay is not well known but is where the ferry to Arran leave from, and the once-grand station at the harbor was renovated 20 years ago and is still in good nick. It is incredible really, and using the wide-angle I get the shots I wanted.

We walk on the beach a bit, between the rubbish and dirt nappies, then decide to try to find the hotel, ending up at another ferry port, in a converted industrial building, mixing with the smart set ordering an Italian feast and beers.

The oddly names town of Largs seems that it will have a fish and chip restaurant, but with the sun has come out and the start of the school holidays, the town was full, and a mini Blackpool with amusement arcades, putting greens and full car parks. The one restaurant we pass is full to the gunnels, so we drive on.

We end up in Ardrossan, another port and stone-built town, this one looking initially as unwelcoming as a few further up the coast. We follow the main road in, then I take the road to the port, and what looked unpromising, turned into a fabulous looking marina, and in a converted port building, we spotted an Italian restaurant. We park outside, and although it looks full, they open up an upper floor for us, which seemed generous, only in half an hour all other tables are taken and another floor above is now being opened.

We have a fine meal, along with drinks, and the service is great too.

We program the postcode for the hotel in the sat nav, and it takes us through industrial areas before turning north and along dual carriageways to Kilmarnock, and besides a busy roundabout sits our home for the night. It’s not bad, and for £50 each we have rooms, a good bed and full breakfast in the morning, but the rooms are hot, not enough ventilation after another very warm Scottish day, and on the bed a winter duvet of 550 tog thickness.

We are pooped; six hours of driving and a couple more of photography, and we want to get to the Premier Inn, in Kilmarnock. Which is where we

Posted by Jelltex on 2017-06-09 05:47:11

Tagged, Jelltex, Jelltecks, Scotland

Scuba diving in Hikkaduwa

Scuba diving in Hikkaduwa

Finally!
I can’t believe all the things that got in the way, but finally, I’m down in Hikkaduwa on the south coast of Sri Lanka. I haven’t dived for almost a year now and it’s been driving me absolutely crazy! Even though diving isn’t up to par with my last workplace in Palau it’s more than enough just to put the tanks on and breathe compressed air for a while.

There is something magical about being underwater that can’t be explained but rather has to be experienced. The weightlessness makes it feel as if though you’re flying over the scenery doing spins, standing on your head and going through caves and tunnels, it really does feel like flying! The sound is also unlike anything on land, all the clicks and ticks with the steady pulsing sound of your breathing, at least it’s supposed to be steady, but that isn’t always true ; ) I love watching the bubbles float up to the surface and see how they split and combine and tear themselves apart, absolutely fantastic!

Animal life in a coral reef is beautiful to the degree of looking unreal, but what’s best about it is that you get so close to them. You could never go up close and look at how the squirrels run around and organize their nuts, but you can easily look at the daily life of fishes on the reef. A lion would never let you close enough to pet him were as a shark can get within reaching distance and not even flinch.

I’ll be posting more shots later from my underwater adventures : )

Camera: Fujifilm Finepix f40

Posted by martinpettersson.com on 2009-03-02 10:47:56

 

My eyes stick to all those shiny robes.

My eyes stick to all those shiny robes.

I was tagged by Dogsy; I would recommend reading his post, if for no other reason than there is an excellent collection of streams to follow!

As I understand it, those tagged are supposed to post a self-portrait. (I’m not really a big meme person, could you tell?) This is a picture of my eye region and other parts of me that may or may not be in focus. It’s not the best picture of me, but I like that it’s both serious and slightly playful. Oxymoronic? I think so.

As you can tell by the weird-ass shadow below my chin, this whole lighting thing isn’t exactly my strength. (I was playing around with a flash diffuser and the only human subject in the house at the time was, well, myself.) I didn’t airbrush as much as I perhaps ought to have, but I’m feeling lazy. And, screw it, that’s how it goes.

Anyway.

1. What I like to photograph the most:
Ummm… aside from pigeons… 😉 I love delving into a city and uncovering things that make it unique: the way the people are and how they act towards one another, the textures of the buildings and other silly architectural details, graffiti, urban vegetation, old signs, and advertisements. Church doors, but I collect those so I’m not sure that it counts.

2. What I like to photograph the least:
I can’t deal with seascape-y photography, it turns out. I’m too anti-cold to do it up here at least. And too impatient. It’s all about the decisive moment, not the decisive 30 seconds. Ugh.

3. Photography Pet Peeves:
People that do weird for the sake of weird. (That’s true in general for me.) I hate when people take a shitty camera and take random ass pictures and call that art. The thoughtful, artistic composition is what makes something art… not random light leaks. The same is true for people who use really high-end cameras. It’s not about the camera.

Although, I must say that when I was starting out (and looking back on it now), it would always bother me when people would say that photography has nothing to do with gear. Putting the onus wholly on a new photographer is just cruel. Clearly, a lot of people produce fantastic images with terrible cameras. However, the fact of the matter is that there are some shots you just cannot get with a P&S and it’s worth mentioning that. The reason I could never get my P&S shots to be really crisp wasn’t that I had shaky hands (although I do), it was that the P&S was simply not capable of taking the shot the same way a high-end anything is. Beginners should not be beating themselves up over stuff like that.

4. What I admire from other photographers:
The way people so skillfully manipulate and work with light, both artificial and natural. That’s the key to this whole thing, right? 🙂

I’ve been following a lot more SF Bay Area photographers lately and I love how interesting they make this place look. It’s probably no secret that I want to move back to Europe, but local shooters are making me appreciate my time here more.

5. What I’d like to learn better:
I mean, aside from lighting – as I haven’t yet begun to enter into that crazy world – I’m trying to get myself to start doing portraiture. I find it easy to capture the spirit of a building, but people are much harder and I’m sure it’s going to take me time to get there.

Now I sound all complaints, so I’m going to do one of those silly lists about me. Me the photographer me.

1. The first two times I modeled for J, I had this nervous worry that I was a better model than I was a photographer. Then last time we went shooting together I was totally dead in the water. This has helped to assuage my doubts but unfortunately left him with a pile of shots of me not paying attention to what I was doing.

2. I find myself drawn more and more to film. There is little doubt in my mind that I will one day move in the Leica direction. My Yashica Electro 35 GSN is more me than any other camera I own. I just like rangefinders. After shooting the M2 for a while, I’m sure anyone could get sick of that huge mirror thunk with every shot. There is nothing stealth about an SLR. (My 35mm Canon is even worse the M2… listening to it automatically advance the film drives me absolutely nuts.)

3. Before photography, I always had gearhead tendencies, but nothing to be a gearhead about. (I can talk to computer parts all day, but I won’t and never would. For my sake as well as yours. No one cares how fast your processor is, you know what I’m saying?) I find lenses and the ways that they can be used absolutely fascinating and I’m impressed with where photographic technology is and where it’s going. I also love messing around with anything mechanical (bring on the power tools!). My proudest accomplishment of late was fixing my new and broken SX-70. It’s all ready to go… except I don’t have any film… oops.

4. Up until very recently, I refused to call myself a photographer. I’ve been an obsessive snapshooter for years and years and that’s how I approached my DSLR until last January. It was only within the past few months that I’ve felt that I’m allowed to refer to myself as a photographer. Unfortunately, I see the world in depths of focus and angles, so even when I don’t have my camera pressed to my eye that’s how it all looks. It’s a ridiculous thing and very unhelpful.

5. Photowalks are just about my favorite thing to do. I love learning about how other people approach the same thing I’m looking at. I feel like it makes me a better photographer. Plus I get to take pictures for an extended period of time and I always love that. So Bay Area people – you ever have a boring Saturday, hit me up and we’ll go somewhere. 🙂

I apologize for blabbing. Just in that kind of mood tonight, I guess.

Posted by under the waves on 2009-11-19 07:51:14

 

Her Gift To Me – Euclid

Her Gift To Me - Euclid

@//W//@ AHHHHH Excuse me while I freak out and flail around for a moment asdfghjkl-

Okay okay okay, SO, I’ve had Rift borrowing Euclid’s body for a few months now because I’ve been making her a lot of things and just for a little change of pace. I actually kind of really love having multiple dolls share a body because I store my dolls heads away and out of sight while they aren’t on bodies so after a while of not seeing them it’s just the most magical experience opening that box and seeing them again. When I took Eui’s head out of the box to put them back on their body….gosh I was just reminded of how much I adore them all over again. xD Absence makes the heart grow fonder and all that. I think that has a lot to do with why I adore Rift so much too, after not seeing her for a while my face just lights up with excitement!
Anyway, another reason Rift was out for so long was because I had been slowly assembling the pieces of a special little something for Euclid off and on and was finally ready to go ahead and make it. That special something, of course, is their new wig!

xD Okay so this is going to be a long story to explain the context of why this is a thing even with me leaving a lot of details out but if you want to know more I’ll put it below.

//CHARACTER RAMBLE BLAH
So you know how Eui’s previous wig was missing a section on the right side? Well, it wasn’t to replicate the side-shaved hairstyles that are trendy these days but because canonically in their story part of Euclid’s hair is burned off…by Faustus. It would take a long time and be quite a spoiler to explain everything so I’ll save that for a different day but the short version is that Euclid was in great danger and it forced Faustus to act upon the situation to save them and while he did, he also ended up hurting Euclid in the process. If you didn’t know, my unicorn characters, the Unitiros, all are made up of a specific type of tangible energy that they both consume and exude and gives them life and while Euclid’s is that of water/ice, Faustus’ is that of fire. Unfortunately due to events that happened prior it left Faustus largely unable to control his power over Fire and he would burn almost anything/anyone he touched (including his trio) and when he did intentionally use his power it was wild and unpredictable so he would not use it unless he thought it was the only option. He was not always like this, however, and this event marked the beginning of a lot of misunderstanding, betrayal, and heartache for all of them.
Anyway, In their species, the hair is EXTREMELY important as a symbol of status and the only time one should ever drastically cut their hair is if they have been severely shamed. The Unitrios are also intensely harsh, catty, and judgemental in nature and even in Euclid’s case where the mutilation that happened to their hair was not their fault, it does not change the fact that they are considered severely shamed and would henceforth be shown very little worth and respect and mostly avoided by other members of their species. Not only that, as the Unitrios form romantic trios rather than pairs, if even one member of the trio has been shamed in any way it reflects equally on the status of the other two so despite what happens to Euclid being deeply traumatic and unintentional, they are forced to suffer even more as the events leave them and their trio largely considered “dead” to the rest of their community. As I said, I won’t get into all the detail here but just know that events that caused Euclid to need saving from combined with the shame and disowning brought upon by Faustus’ actions left Euclid in a deeply traumatized and basically “comatose” state (one under normal circumstances they should have died from) for a long time. Faustus, of course, felt deep, all-consuming guilt for the terrible pain that he caused Euclid both physically (burns do physically hurt Unitrios but do not leave lasting effects on their skin nor can kill them in normal circumstances, but can still burn away their hair) and mentally and he felt like a liability to Euclid and everyone else around him, someone who could only hurt the ones he loved rather than protect them and this mindset caused him to become very distant to Euclid for a long time; time when they really needed him the most.
Fast-forwarding quite a lot but eventually though time and the love and compassion of Hyacinth (the other member of Faustus and Euclid’s trio…*cough*) Euclid is largely able to recover from these events and instead of cowering in shame from what happens they become a stronger (albeit completely different) person from it and learns to wear their scars with dignity despite what foul rumors and disrespect are aimed at them. But even the strongest of people have their insecurities and even at this point if Euclid were to be insulted for it they’d play it off with a witty remark, deep down they were still very much insecure about it as it was a constant reminder of mistakes they believe they had made. In truth, Euclid never blamed Faustus for what happened but rather blamed themself for creating the events that lead to it happening.
Fast-forwarding again a bit into the future and the truth about what happened that day and who/what exactly was the cause of a lot of their trio’s misfortunes, Faustus’s affliction of being unable to control his power, and how Euclid even survived that day finally came to light. Again, huge spoilers there so won’t get into all of that now, but because of the way a lot of things happened both Euclid them self and most other people assumed that Euclid was the central cause of everything that went wrong when really they weren’t, or at least, they were not responsible for causing Faustus’s affliction which essentially started this avalanche of awful.
So where does the new wig come in? Well, before Euclid’s innocence was known regarding the cause of Faustus’ affliction, Calliope (Faustus’ younger sister) somewhat disliked Euclid purely because once Faustus and Euclid had met suddenly Faustus had very little time for Calliope anymore and Unitrios siblings are extremely (I mean almost uncomfortably) close. Then when Faustus’ became cursed with his terrible affliction Calliope rather unfairly began to pin Euclid more and more as the cause of it with every passing day as more things went wrong. Calliope’s own prior bias against Euclid and deep unwavering love to her brother caused an otherwise compassionate and reasonable person to become cruel and bitter to someone who didn’t deserve it and said some truly heartless things. When it was finally revealed to everyone that Euclid was not the cause of what happened to Faustus, Calliope realized that she had projected so much anger and cruelty onto Euclid who was not only innocent the whole time but had endured so much more cruelty and pain than anyone she had ever know and felt so much shame and guilt for being a part of it. Calliope wanted to do something to atone for her wrongdoings and perhaps help Euclid to forgive her and she knew there was only one thing she could give that could ever show how sorry she was; her hair. Calliope knew that everyone else in their community had been doing the same as her in heartlessly judging and disrespecting Euclid all because of what happened to their hair even with how undeserving they actually were and know their community would still continue to insult and devalue Euclid so long as their hair was still mangled as it was. Ordinarily, it would not be possible to do what Calliope had wanted, but she happened to have a friend who is a master of mending and thought just maybe she could help. Her friend, Xinka, is from a sort of “dragon-like” species and she was the unique ability to mend any of the scales that fall off back into her body since they do not naturally grow back. This ability is normal for those of her species but she is exceptionally gifted with it and can bond all manner of things together in a similar process from fabric to stone. So in an act of selflessness Calliope enlisted Xinka for her help and cut off some of her prized, unusually long and fast-growing hair for Xinka to mend onto Euclid’s burned areas so finally they would not have to bear such constant shame and torment any longer (and thankfully Calliope has such full, long and curly hair that cutting some away in strategic places made it almost completely unnoticeable so she would not have to bear the same ridicule, though she did intentionally cut the long locks of hair framing her face as she felt she needed the experience of “wearing her scars with dignity” as Euclid did). Of course, Euclid being the wonderfully kind and understanding person that they are never thought ill of Calliope even when she was at her worst as she knew she acted that way out of love for Faustus and no matter their differences this is always something they will have in common. Euclid was completely overcome with the purest of love and thankfulness for what Calliope and Xinka had done for them as it was truly the greatest and most selfless gift that could ever be given. Now instead of looking back at their reflection as seeing a missing piece, a reminder of all the pain and heartache they have to endure, they see beautiful locks of blue hair as clear and radiant as the water itself reminding them that it is the people who they love and show love in return who will always be a part of them.
//END CHARACTER RAMBLE BLAH

T//w//T So yeah. I left a lot of things out and just gave the bare bones there since its hella spoilers and all of these events span across literally years but yeah, hopefully, that explains it decently enough and gives a bit more insight in regards to Euclid’s hair which I don’t know if I ever explained here before lol xD
^//w//^ So yeah, I had been slowly working with a batch of alpaca washing, combing, dyeing, wefting, etc. over the last month or so getting it ready to work on this super special wig for Euclid and GOSH am I happy with it *A*
Seriously, I was a little hesitant as to how it would turn out since I had some not-so-perfect results with my last few wigs but I’m so happy that this came out even better than I had hoped for. ;//A//: Seriously…Euclid is just so perfect I can’t. Everything they touch just turns to perfection for me and its just the greatest feeling ever in this hobby. I feel like I constantly struggle with my dolls and feeling that they are lacking or that the things I make/do for them just aren’t quite “there” you know? But with Euclid everything just seems to fall right into place just as I want it to and thus the journey of getting them “complete” has been so much more fast-moving and enjoyable. Ahh, it’s hard to explain, but I bet we all have that one doll that somehow exceeds our expectations haha~
TwT Anyways, rambling but yeah! So obviously the blue section on this wig is meant to represent Calliope’s hair and I was able to get the color spot on so I’m super happy with that. eye That was another reason why I really wanted to incorporate more blue tones into Euclid’s faceup because I knew I’d be making this wig eventually and it to really look like the perfect extension of themselves like it was meant to be. xD Also…I had a huge happy accident when dying the purple parts because I somehow ended up with two distinctly different shades of purple which wasn’t my intention but I’m so happy it happened that way because it really ties together perfectly with the different purple tones in their faceup and also with their seahorse tail. Ack, love it so much~ TwT Ahhh, and also I forgot to mention that this is actually more like Euclid’s natural hair texture. It should be a little less curly and wavier but its pretty close. Euclid purposefully styled their hair more smooth and somewhat “masculine” when it was in its burned state as an additional layer of change in their persona, but this wig represents Euclid going back to a time that was lost, taking a moments to reprieve to revive a side of them they never thought they could get back.
…xD Also these eyes aren’t for Euclid haha I was just trying some Oscardoll eyes in them so I could see what size I need for them because my next big eye hunt is going to be for them…but these looked super good so figured I’d leave them in for a while haha. Euclid actually has two ever so slightly different colored eyes (one more blue and the other more purple) but its hard to find ones that are dark enough and have a subtle but noticeable difference so eventually, I’m going to try and track down two pairs of dark purple and dark blueish purple Oscardoll eyes for them so wish me luck xD //shot

OKAY WOW RAMBLING. Alright, I’m done….xD Except that I wanted to say that my Fairyland Momo bunny is on her way home!! Yaaay is so excited! xD I’ll have to snap a photo of her and my IOS Co together since I haven’t posted him here either since he’s blank lol.
….Oh, and of course, my SIO2 Ragdoll still hasn’t shipped yet. Can’t forget to add that xD //shot


Euclid (gender fluid) is a modded Fairyland Minifee Luka on a Fairyline body in Beautiful White skin. Faceup, mods, horn, and wig by me.

 

25 things

25 things

This 25 things about yourself ‘notes’ application has been taking the social networking tool Facebook by storm. I decided to make a little project out of it for myself. Even if you don’t know me, you do a little bit now.

1. My parents are divorced. The process didn’t exactly take as quick as I explain here, but it was around 4th grade or so when the effect could really be felt. My dad worked, and my mom was elsewhere (to skip grueling detail that I prefer not to go into). In protest of getting a babysitter, I asked my dad to attempt to leave me home alone when I was 10 years old. He tried it. That event marked the end of my childhood in his eyes.

2. My first gaming system was not an original Nintendo, but a Super Nintendo. My first game was Super Mario World, a game that I will always love, and have the luxury of playing on my computer from a SNES emulator I got, as well as a USB gaming controller. Ain’t nothing like the old school.

3. I learned how to ride a bike outside of my Granny and Poppa’s house when they lived in North Woodmere. I was on training wheels and when I was learning on two wheels, I would fall A LOT. One day, I wanted to try the neighbor’s daughter’s bike, which was two wheels. As if I had been writing a bike with two wheels previously for some period of time, I rode around the street on this bike without falling. The rest of that story was history symbolized by other bikes and one too many cuts and scrapes on my skin.

4. I used to be obsessed with WWF (when its title wasn’t a copyright infringement). My two favorite wrestlers were Shawn Michaels and ‘Stone Cold’ Steve Austin. I would make my dad pay obscene amounts of money to watch the most important matches on PPV (Pay Per View), and would marvel in these characters for reasons unbeknown to me. One day, I gave it up cold fish when it got too complex for me. It was about the time when relations became closer between WWF and WCW.

5. I attended the same day camp for 12 summers, Rolling River Day Camp. I was there from 3rd grade and experienced just about everything there was to experience that camp, included being suspended for being an unruly preteen and throwing quarters at a comedian in a comedy club in Mineola called ‘Governor’s’ (which RRDC was never invited back to again). There, I met basically all of my most longstanding friends. RRDC to this day has a permanent place in my heart, mind, and soul, although I gave the place up a few years ago.

6. Why did I give up RRDC? This is a story. One of my longest-standing friends’ (Joe Pezzuto) dad worked for Nassau County at the Bay Park Water Treatment Facility. I was able to get a job through his dad, where I was going to work on the construction crew for the summer at $12/hour. Due to supervisor politics (we’ll keep that part short), my job title was changed 3 times in less than a week, where I eventually ended up on the Building Maintenance crew. Long story short, I was a janitor at a sewage treatment plant and experienced some of the most disgusting and intriguing things I will probably ever experience. No job will top that just based on its nature.

7. I have a friend who has Tourette’s Syndrome. It is something he has been living with all of his life and goes to Buffalo with me. One day he asked me to write a piece about him as an individual living with Tourette’s (a great human interest piece). I wrote for the student newspaper The Spectrum at the time. I wrote this piece on him, and it ran the front page and center. I consider this to be one of my biggest writing accomplishments, as well as a time where I learned something about a friend as well as syndrome I had little to no idea about. (See link below for the story)
spectrum.buffalo.edu/article.php?id=35594

8. I had a friend when I was very young, his name was Joey Terrell (unsure of the last name spelling). It’s been a long time since I’ve seen him. To the best of my knowledge, he had moved out to Cali with his mom and sister or something after his mother divorced his drunken father. My dad wasn’t very fond of him, on the basis that my dad is completely convinced that it was him that first taught me how to steal when I took my dad’s Zippo lighter.

9. There is a footbridge by my house that transverses a canal and connects one completely separate street to another up the block from my house. One day I and some people were on the bridge, and there were a few boards missing, which I was aware of…However…I took a false step and one of my legs in its entirety from toe to upper thigh was swallowed by the bridge, causing a huge scrape going up my entire leg caused by the missing wooden plank. One of the kids’ parents sent pictures of the bridge to the county, they then replaced the planks on that bridge.

10. One of the guys who are tagged in this note (specifically Evan Pilnick), his mom was both of our nursery school teachers. I have a memory of being tested on how to tie my shoes in front of her. I screwed it up.

11. My dad has kept every single report card I have ever received, even from when I was graded on my shoe-tying ability all the way up until the last report card I ever received as a graduating senior in high school. He’s very sentimental about keeping things like that. I’m fairly certain he still has my baby cradle up in the attic.

12. I talk a lot about my dad, especially with the divorce, but this doesn’t mean I don’t have a good relationship with my mom. It was rare enough where the father gets custody, let alone a child (only child mind you) ends up having a decent relationship with both parents as individuals. My mom has had an extremely rough life, once again sparing details… She now currently lives in Buffalo, after the emergency of all family emergencies came, and I went down to Florida and moved her out and flew her up to Buffalo with her own money. Details aside, I consider this incident to be the single greatest struggle I have EVER had to deal with. It wasn’t a choice, it was a necessity unless I wanted to experience the loss of my mother from the eyes of a 19-year-old.

13. I was in a band with a few friends, all of which are tagged in this note. We were called Second To Last. This was the first and only taste I would ever have of what it was like to play music in an organized group of people. We played for friends in backyard environments, but there was one time I will never forget. We did a cover of Blink182’s ‘Dammit’ at a talent show at JFK High School. I still have the recording to this day. That song, that environment, those people, that circumstance, I will never forget.

14. I middle school I tried smoking. I was on the verge of getting mixed up in a bad crowd, and the threat of summer school was imminent since I wasn’t doing well in school and I really didn’t care. I was walking across the street one day after school and crossed in between a bus and a car. The driver of the car was my 7th-8th grade math teacher, Ms. Dugan, easily the evilest teacher I’ve ever had the disgrace of having. She talked to my guidance counselor who called my dad, he urged me not to make the mistakes he did, I never smoked again.

15. I’ve only experienced 1 funeral in my life. It would have been two if my dad had let me go to his father’s funeral (my grandfather). Both were Jewish funerals, and if you are unaware of the proceedings of such a ritual, there is nothing sadder than to watch loved ones bury their own dead. I always thought it was fair to conclude that 1 funeral changed me somehow, although I can’t quite conjure the words to describe how. I should only consider myself fortunate the count so far has been low.

16. I’ve been playing guitar since I’ve been in fourth grade. This was my alternative instrument after I quit playing the viola, the unwanted stepchild of the orchestra next to the guiding light and favored child, THE VIOLIN. Nobody knew how to pronounce the instrument’s name anyway…I chose the viola after we were put in the music room with the lights off, and told to run to an instrument. I got stuck with the viola. I still to this day cannot really cite read at all, and still play the guitar since I picked it up in 4th grade.

17. I picked up the hobby of photography when I went to college. My dad bought me a digital camera, and from then on, I started looking at my surroundings differently. I’m fascinated about how a camera can capture something completely different than the human eye can. From that nasty summer job I mentioned earlier, I bought a Nikon D80, a semi-pro DSLR, which was about a $1,4000 investment. I haven’t regretted that decision since (check out my photostream on Flickr)
flickr.com/photos/hizzy/

18. Speaking of regrets, there are two regrets I have in my life that come to my mind when I think of that word, and both are along similar lines. Quitting winter track in 9th grade, and quitting guitar lessons in 11th grade when I finally surrendered to the fact that I had neither the tenacity or the skills to learn music theory. After quitting track, I couldn’t look my coach in the face again for the feelings of the embarrassment it brought. I still have my track uniform from high school somewhere in my closet. I still play guitar, but never ventured out to experience how good I could get.

19. I pride myself on being an atypical male. The male that breaks from the stereotype, the male that was never highly influenced by culture to turn him into whatever you readers come to stereotype with men. I love communicating, and I pride myself even more about listening. Those skills have gotten me friends as well as the most important female with whom I’ve been dating for a little over a year to this day.

20. That girl I was talking about? Her name is Brooke. She was a good friend of mine for 4 years before our paths ended up crossing in a fashion well beyond strictly platonic. The story is a good one, but I wanna keep this short. She’s been the most important influence in my life, and her support and individuality have gone unmatched among anyone I’ve met. I couldn’t imagine not being with her now. Kissing her was the most important decision of my entire life. Maybe one day, actions I hope to take will echo those past happenings. In that one instance, I abide by the saying, “fortune favors the bold.”

21. I’ve worn high heels before. Specifically, I’ve marched in them, twice. Sorry, one time I was wearing ballet flats. Whatever your assumptions are about why I did this, you can leave it at the door now, because you probably wouldn’t even come close to understanding. The answer primarily is that I marched in an event at UB called ‘Walk A Mile in Her Shoes’, which is a calling to men in specific to take a stance against sexual violence, gender violence, and anything that is encoded in cultural norms which disallows people from truly expressing themselves without being scorned. I did this not just for women, or to know what it feels like to wear high heels. I did this to prove something to myself and others. No other thing have I have participated in throughout my life has rivaled the stance I’ve taken at this march for back to back years thus far. I intend on marching in it once more. This time, instead of borrowing a pair available there, I’m buying my own. Swallow that.

22. I’ve been working on this for a really long time, and I can’t believe some of the things I’m saying, but go big or go home, right?

23. I’m a Yankee fan, but I was originally a Mets fan. The Mets were who I was exposed to the most when I was young and has been my single highest-attended sporting event next to my favorite hockey team, the Islanders. It became apparent to me that I had to ‘go along to get along’, and so, I converted to being a Yankee fan. Needless to say, baseball, nor any sport, in particular, is of extreme importance to me, but my favorite sport would probably have to be hockey.

24. In my sophomore year in college, I suddenly became very ambitious and became very involved on my campus. I never did anything in high school and just barely got into UB. I probably went to UB for some of the wrong reasons, but I don’t regret where I am now, not by far. To this day, I’ve established myself pretty well here on this campus in multiple areas of concentration from research in psychology to residence life to admissions to student journalism. This point isn’t for bragging. How else is this life we live worthwhile if we don’t give back to the community we’re a part of somehow? All in all, I would like to think that beyond a piece of paper that says I’m a college grad or a piece of paper that lists my qualifications, in the end, I would want to know that I helped contribute to something which sets out to make a difference. My question to you is: how are you going to make a mark on the world when you’re through with this life?

25. I’m not a religious person, I don’t even know if I consider myself spiritual, but I abide by some code of conduct in my mind. I don’t know what it is, nor do I know the origin of my thought patterns, but I believe in a few things these days. I believe in the power of love, affection, and friendship. I believe in the power of selflessness, whether it comes to helping others, or just being thankful for what you got. There are plenty of people out there who have it worse off than you, so think twice before indulging in mass-complaint hysteria. Don’t let politics get in the way of seeing through to the bigger picture sometimes. Dissent is the truest form of patriotism. Find a conviction and stick strongly to it. Leave behind some reason to be missed. You may need money to get you by to an extent, but it won’t solve nearly all your problems. What can you do to make yourself feel whole and alive?

Posted by ycguitar814 on 2009-02-04 01:55:16

Tagged:

How do you do? In Kenya

How do you do? In Kenya

Many people ask me on Flickr how do I do to make my pictures. I think those little video sequences will help to get an answer!
This is not a tutorial, it’s just nice moments!

Lake Turkana, Kenya
The Turkana s inhabit the arid territories of northern Kenya, on the boundary with Sudan. Nilotic-speaking people, they have for a long time stayed outside of the influence of the main foreign trends. Nomad shepherds adapted to an almost totally desert area, some also fish in Lake Turkana. They are divided into 28 clans. Each one of them is associated with a particular brand for its livestock, so that any Turkana can identify a relative in this way. The majority of the Turkana still follow their traditional religion: they believe in a God called Kuj or Akuj, associated with the sky and creator of all things. He is thought to be omnipotent but rarely intervenes in the lives of people. Contact between God and the people is made though a diviner (Emerson). Diviners have the power to interpret dreams, forecast the future, heal, and make rain. However, the Turkana doubt about those who say they have powers but fail to prove it in everyday life. According to estimates, about 15% of the Turkana are Christian. Evangelism has started among the Turkana since the 1970s. Various church buildings have been built since then. The most astonishing element one can notice in the villages is that the only permanent structures are churches, with huts all around. In fact, in the late 1970s, feeding projects, as well as literacy courses and other services, have been provided by Baptist workers. This easily explains the importance acquired by the Church. The Turkana don’t have any physical initiations. They have only the aspen ceremony, transition from youth to adulthood, that all men must perform before marriage. The Turkana are polygamous. Homestead consists of a man, his wives and children, and often his mother. When a new wife comes, she stays at the hut of the mother or first wife until she has her first child. The high bride-wealth payment (30 to 50 cattle, 30 to 50 camels and 100 to 200 small stock) often means that a man cannot marry until he has inherited livestock from his dead father. It also implies that he collect livestock from relatives and friends, which strengthens social ties between them. Resolution is found to conflict through discussions between the men living in proximity to one another. Men of influence have particularly listened, and decisions are enforced by the younger men of the area. Each man belongs to a specific generation set. If a man is a Leopard, his son will be a Stone, so that there is approximately an equal number of each category. The Turkana make finely carved wooden implements, used in daily life. During the rainy season, moonlight nights’ songs have a particular place in the Turkana’s life. The songs often refer to their cattle or land, but they are sometimes improvised and related to immediate events. The Turkana have a deep knowledge of plants and products they use as medicine. The fat-tailed sheep is often called “the hospital for the Turkana”.

Les Turkanas habitent les territoires arides du nord du Kenya, à la frontière avec le Soudan.Peuple de langue nilotique, ils sont pendant longtemps restés hors de l’influence des principaux courants étrangers. Pasteurs nomades adaptés à une zone presque totalement déserte, certains pêchent également dans le lac Turkana. Ils sont divisés en 28 clans. Chacun d’entre eux est associé à une marque particulière donné à son bétail, de telle façon que tout Turkana peut identifier un parent de cette manière.La majorité des Turkana suit encore leur religion traditionnelle : ils croient en un Dieu appelé Kuj ou Akuj, associé au ciel et créateur de toute chose. Les Turkana le voient comme omnipotent mais intervenant rarement dans la vie des gens. Le contact entre Dieu et les hommes se fait par l’intermédiaire d’un divin (emeron). Les devins ont le pouvoir d’interpréter les rêves, prédire l’avenir, soigner et faire pleuvoir. Toutefois, les Turkana doutent de ceux qui disent qu’ils ont des pouvoirs, mais échouent à le prouver dans la vie de tous les jours. Selon des estimations, environ 15% des Turkana sont chrétiens. L’évangélisme a commencé chez les Turkana depuis les années 1970. Diverses églises ont depuis été construites. L’élément le plus étonnbant que l’on peut noter dans les villages est que les seules structures en dur sont les églises, avec des huttes tout autour. En fait, à la fin des années 1970, des projets alimentaires ainsi que des cours d’alphabétisation et d’autres services ont été menés par des travailleurs baptistes. Cela explique facilement l’importance acquise par l’Eglise.Les Turkana n’ont aucune initiation physique. Ils ont seulement la cérémonie asapan, transition de la jeunesse à l’âge adulte, que chaque homme doit suivre avant le mariage. Les Turkana sont polygames. La propriété familiale est composée d’un homme, ses femmes et enfants, et souvent sa mère. Quand une nouvelle femme arrive, elle loge dans la hutte de la mère ou de la première femme jusqu’à ce qu’elle ait son premier enfant. Le paiement élevé pour la mariée (30 à 50 têtes de gros bétail, 30 à 50 dromadaires, et 100 à 200 têtes de petit bétail) signifie souvent qu’un homme ne peut se permettre de se marier jusqu’à ce qu’il ait hérité le bétail de son père décédé. Cela implique également qu’il collecte le bétail requis de parents et amis, ce qui renforce les liens sociaux entre eux. La résolution des conflits se fait par la discussion entre les hommes vivant à proximité.Les hommes d’influence sont particulièrement écoutés, et les décisions sont mises en application par les hommes plus jeunes de la zone. Chaque homme appartient à une classe d’âge spécifique. Si un homme est un Léopard, son fils deviendra une Pierre, de telle façon qu’il y a approximativement un même nombre de chaque catégorie. Les Turkana font des outils en bois finement taillés, utilisés dans la vie de tous les jours. Durant la saison des pluies, les chansons des nuits de pleine lune ont une place particulière dans la vie des Turkana. Elles font souvent référence à leur bétail et terres, mais sont parfois improvisées ou liées à des événements immédiats. Les Turkana ont une connaissance intime des plantes et des produits qu’ils utilisent comme médicaments. La queue grasse des moutons est souvent appelée « l’hôpital pour les Turkana ».

© Eric Lafforgue
www.ericlafforgue.com

Posted by Eric Lafforgue on 2009-08-08 15:43:07

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